Man who solved the Jack the Ripper Mystery visits old site of Leavesden Hospital

The man who produced “the first bit of tangible information” to solve the mystery of who Jack the Ripper was visited the old site of Leavesden Hospital this week. Russell Edwards, author of Naming Jack the Ripper, was always led to believe there was nothing left of Leavesden Hospital – the place where alleged Jack the Ripper, Aaron Kosminski, spent most of his adult life. But Mr Edwards said: “My friend told me there was a guy doing tours around the old Leavesden Hospital, and that was only last Monday. “I called up Martin Brooks (chairman of the Leavesden Hospital
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BBC Radio 5 Live Jack the Ripper Mystery Solved

Jack the Ripper mystery solved? Have researchers finally uncovered the identity of Jack the Ripper? Russell Edwards, author of Naming Jack the Ripper, said he has compiled evidence of who the world’s most famous serial killer really was. Along with Dr Jari Louhelainen, a Research Scientist at Liverpool John Moores University, Mr Edwards has examined a shawl taken from one of the murder scenes and identified DNA belonging to Aaron Kosminski, the man they have now named as Jack the Ripper. This clip is originally from 5 live Breakfast on Sunday 7 September 2014. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0266szr/player Save
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Has Jack the Rippers identity finally been revealed

For over a century the identity of notorious serial killer Jack the Ripper has baffled criminologists but modern DNA technology has finally solved the mystery, it has been claimed. Polish man Aaron Kosminski has been named by a world renowned DNA expert as the killer behind the 1888 murders of at least five women in London’s Whitechapel. ITV News’ Luke Farrington reports. Dr Jari Louhelainen, a senior lecturer of molecular biology at Liverpool John Moores University came to the conclusion after analysing a shawl belonging to one of the victims, according to the Mail on Sunday newspaper. The item of
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Russell Edwards Lectures at Wolverhampton University

Russell Edwards and Dr Jari Louhelainen, Senior Lecturer of Molecular Biology were honoured to be invited to present their story to Wolverhampton University last week.  The story runs along-side the unvailing of Wolverhampton Civil and Historical Society unveiling their sponsored plaque for Catherine Eddowes who lived nearby at 20 Merridale Street, Graiseley Green.  Catherine Eddowes was of course murdered by Jack the Ripper on 30th September 1888 in Whitechapel. You can read more about Catherine Eddowes by visiting our victims page Save
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The East End in the 1800s

Except taken from ‘Naming Jack the Ripper’ by Russell Edwards It is just another phase: the East End has been through so many incarnations over the centuries. But the most interesting time to me is the 1880s, the era that spawned the Ripper Murders. In those times the neighbourhoods of Whitechapel and Spitalfields, as well as nearby districts like Bethnal Green, St George in the East and Poplar, had some of the most scandalously poor living conditions in London. The East End was, in parts, a vast, dirty, overcrowded slum, struggling to cope with the sheer number of people choosing to live there. Much of this was down
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Whitechapel in the 1880s

For centuries the East End had been a great melting pot, and until this massive flood of immigrants it had dealt well with incomers, but now it was stretched to breaking point, and anyone who could afford to move away did, leaving a population who were, by and large, scraping by. Survival was the key, food and lodging the most important aims. Typhoid, cholera and venereal disease were rife, and the area had the highest birth rate, the highest death rate and the lowest marriage rate in the whole of London. Housing was the big problem. Whereas parts of Whitechapel and Spitalfields had once been prosperous and semi-rural, demand throughout
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Bid to trace Jack the Ripper victims family links in Shropshire

The man who claims to have identified the real name of Jack The Ripper has visited Shropshire as part of his research into one of the killer’s victims. Jack The Ripper killed at least five women in the East End of London during the “autumn of terror” of 1888. Russell Edwards hit the headlines last year when he claimed to have used DNA from a shawl found at the scene of the fourth murder to name the killer. He also claimed to have proved that a woman living in the Wolverhampton area is definitely related to that fourth victim, whose
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The History of Leavesden Asylum

The foundation stone for Leavesden Asylum was laid on 31st October 1868 by the Chairman of the Management Committee, William Henry Wyatt, J.P. The first patients were not admitted until 9th October 1870, the same date as the opening of Caterham Asylum. Both Asylums were built and run by the recently constituted Metropolitan Asylums Board for the care of “insane paupers” who were “such harmless persons of the chronic or imbecile class as could lawfully be detained in a workhouse”. “Dangerous or curable” patients were to be sent to the county lunatic asylums. By 15th October Leavesden had over 100
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Aaron Kosminski Admission to Leavesden Asylum

Aaron Kosminski was registered at Leavesden Asylum Hospital on the 19th April 1894. The following are the details of his admission; Registered No. Of Admission: 7367 Name: Kozminksi Aaron Date of Admission: 19th April 1894 Age: 29 Parish: Mile End Married, Single, or Widowed: left blank Previous Occupation: Hairdresser Religion: Jew When and where under previous care and treatment as mentally affected: Colney Hatch Number of previous attacks: left blank Whether subject to Epilepsy: No Whether suicidal or dangerous: No Name and address of nearest known relative, and degree of relationship: Mother, Mrs Kozminski, 63 New Street, New Road, Whitechapel,
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Aaron Kosminski and Colney Hatch Asylum

A week before the 7th February 1891, Aaron Kosminski was sent to Mile End Workhouse shortly after the attack on his own sister with a knife. He was then sent to Colney Hatch Asylum suffering with a form of disorder diagnosed at the time known as mania. No member of his family challenged this decision and finally the brutal murderer regarded as Jack the Ripper would never taste freedom again. Colney Hatch Asylum was opened at Friern Barnet in July 1851 as the second pauper lunatic asylum for the county of Middlesex. In 1851 Colney Hatch, designed in the Italianate
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