Shawl that nailed Polish Lunatic Aaron Kosminski and the Forensic expert that made the critical match

By Dr Jari Louhelainen When Russell Edwards first approached me in 2011, I wasn’t aware of the massive levels of interest in the Ripper case, as I’m a scientist originally from Finland. But by early this year, when I realised we were on the verge of making a big discovery, working on the shawl had taken over my life, occupying me from early in the morning until late at night. It has taken a great deal of hard work, using cutting-edge scientific techniques which would not have been possible five years ago. To extract DNA samples from the stains on
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The Jack the Ripper Tour

It’s a dreary night in old London, the cobbled streets of Whitechapel are deserted, its lonely and frightening, even more so if you have been abducted by a maniac, one that seems to dislike women so much that he murders them.  Nobody really knows who Jack the ripper was, many have come close to naming him but not quite. Only one man has dared to take the plunge and gather real concrete evidence, in the form of a old shawl bought at auction. Only one man has dared to investigate this shawl, and through his observant eye question the markings that others would have overlooked as being mould.
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Century Old Mystery Solved

Media coverage of Russell Edward's book, Naming Jack the Ripper : New Crime Scene Evidence, A Stunning Forensic Breakthrough, The Killer Revealed.

Amazon: "Bringing together ground-breaking forensic discoveries - including vital DNA evidence - and gripping historical detective work, Naming Jack the Ripper constructs the first truly convincing case for identifying the world's most notorious serial killer."
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The Report of Sir Charles Warren

London had begun to forget all about the horrible Whitechapel murders, when one morning not long ago the great metropolis was shaken from the innermost recesses of the city to the elegant suburbs that have been lately built for the occupation of the wealthy and cultivated by the announcement that Sir Charles Warren's dogs were loose.
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Michaelmas Daisies

Michaelmas is celebrated on 2 dates of the year. They are the dates that the Ripper went out to murder his victims. There were numerous newspaper reports stating that a garment was discovered that had ‘Michalemas daisies and golden lillies’ at the murder scene of Catherine Eddowes on the night of the ‘Double Event’.
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Walking in the footsteps of Jack the Ripper

It is often said that Jack the Ripper had five victims, collectively known as the ‘canonical five’; they are Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes and Mary Kelly, all murdered in a ten week period in that fateful year of 1888. However, the Whitechapel murders, as they were considered at the time, before the case began to be dissected by ex-police officers and theorists, were a much larger series of crimes, beginning in April 1888 with Emma Smith and ending in February 1891 with Frances Coles.
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Kosminski Asylum Record

His family probably shuttled him around between their homes. The date was 4 February 1891, and it appears that his mental health had now deteriorated to a state that the family, who had been sheltering and supporting him, could no longer cope. On his admission, the register of patients stated that he was suffering from ‘mania’ and he was examined by a doctor, Edmund Houchin, who wrote a report on his findings and declared Kosminski insane
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Ripper Victims

As has already been pointed out, the ‘Whitechapel murders’ did not just consist of the crimes attributed to Jack the Ripper and there has been much debate as to whether any of the others could have been committed by him. In fact, the blame for any act of random violence against women would at that time be, for a moment at least, firmly laid at the feet of the Ripper. Two murders, subsequent to that of Mary Kelly, did have many guessing, however.
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